Portsmouth Yardstick

Guest
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I am new to this forum as I have only had my Heard 28 since Easter so please forgive my ignorance if some of the subjects are common knowledge. Does anyone know if there is a PY for a H28 with large cruising rig? Also is a handy billy another name for a whip? ie a block and tackle tied to the halliard to tension it. I am based at Benfleet in Essex; is there anyone out there close to me with a 28 as I would love to have a look at how some of the others are set up. I have read the thread about furling gear and found it most useful. I have a retractable bow sprit but intend trying to leave the jib up furled some nights when I am on board. Of course I will have the sprit out if I am at anchor or moored but not in a marina. I think I will have to tie the jib back to the mast. As yet I haven't changed the halliard from the layed rope so I will get braided rope before I start experimenting.

By the way my boat is Laura June. I have had e-mail conversations with Colin on some subjects and he has been most helpful; thanks Colin.

Guest
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Thanks Steve and Brian. In the end we finished 17th which was about right I think as there was a 6 mile beat against the tide in force 6 gusting 7. Somehow I doubt that those are her best conditions but we had a good sail anyway. We had two reefs in the main and full headsails up; this seemed to work ok and was very well balanced but to windward we could have tried the smaller jib. The bow sprit was a constant worry as it was very bent! A friend of mine has said right from the start it is too light. The Memories in the race did not do at all well; one retired and the other finished about 28th although many other yachts did not finish or even start owing to the conditions. We were the first gaff rigged boat and there is a trophy but to be fair there weren't many out.

Lloyd

Brian Neale
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Joined: 03 Sep 2006

In that case, I would definitely go with the Twister handicap - much more favourable! You can sort out the right one later...

I'm not a very serious racer - just the odd local OGA event - although I did take part in the Round the Island this year. Quite a spectacle seen from inside the middle of the fleet!

Aeolus FWB28
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Joined: 26 Aug 2006

Hello Lloyd, may I add my welcome to Brian's.
I only race Aeolus in the Fowey Classics. My OGA handicap is 0.946 I see that another 28,Doris of Mylor has 0.976 and a Twister has 0.895
These may mean more to you and Brian than they do to me!

If you have furling headsails and you leave them out when not in use,then do check that they have UV strips. For reasons only understood in Cornish, my original Jib had no UV strip --I somehow didnt realise this-- and only lasted a few seasons!

I wish you good sailing and lots of enjoyment with your 28. Steve

Brian Neale
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Joined: 03 Sep 2006

Hmm, yes, Memories... Because the handicap doesn't take displacement into account, their size gives them a good handicap, and then they sail like a racing dinghy on steroids. The local fleet always seems to do well. Bitter? Me? Never!

Technically, I think that a whip is a different kind of tackle. Think of a halyard that only comes down to about head level with a block on the end. Take a line fixed to the foot of the mast up through the block and back down to give a 2:1 advantage when tensioning the halyard. I believe that that is a whip.

Good trip for a delivery trip - Guernsey to E coast! I brought mine from Falmouth back to the Solent, but did it in 2 or 3 hops. Haven't done a long passage since but keep thinking about cross-channel "maybe next year"...

Guest
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Thanks for all the info Brian. I have got Hand Reef and Steer and thoroughly enjoyed it. I guessed that a handy billy was as you described but I had heard it called a whip!
Tomorrow (Saturday) I am sailing in the Nore Race. This is a local event with about 60-70 boats at least and it is run on a PY system anyway they have decided that I am about the same as a Twister although how they came to that conclusion I don't know.
I have another boat at present; she is a Memory 19 called Turnstone and her previous owner gave me the book by Tom Cuncliffe. Unfortunately I haven't had time to get Turnstone in the water yet this year but I hope to sail her again soon. I bought Laura in Guernsey and sailed her back to Benfleet arriving on Easter Saturday. It was my first Channel crossing but we were incredibly lucky as the weather was perfect and the wind was in the right direction so it was easy and good fun. I have just fitted the boom gallows today so I will be trying it out for the first time tomorrow. I hope I have got the height right! Next year I will make myself available to anyone who needs a crew on a FWB 28 for a couple of races and then I think I will learn more. I am doing the Swale Match later in August but I know there won't be any Heards there but it is great to see the Essex Smacks and the Thames Barges (last year two collided)
Thanks again Lloyd

Brian Neale
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Joined: 03 Sep 2006

...and a handy-billy is what the layman might call a block-and-tackle (which should be pronounced "taykle", of course, to confuse non-gaffers). Main point is that it is not permanently part of the rig and can be used for different purposes. I have one which is used for reefing; it lives on a shelf just inside the companionway and when needed hooks to an eye on the boom near the gooseneck and the reefing line at the clew end. It is a multi-part purchase with built-in jamming cleat. It's the kind of thing that you might also want to use to take the load off a foresail sheet, for example, to free a riding turn on a winch.

I can recommend "Gaff Rig" by John Leather for general background, and more specifically for handling tips "Hand, Reef and Steer" by Tom Cunliffe, and "Classic Boat Seamanship" by Martin Tregonning, should you happen to be browsing in the local library!

Brian Neale
Brian's picture
Joined: 03 Sep 2006

Welcome aboard, Lloyd! Always good to see a new member.

Not sure about PY but most 28s seem to sail under a T(H)CF handicap which is used to multiply elapsed time to give corrected time. My 28 sails to 0.963, but they all vary a bit depending on exactly how big the rig is. Roughly, it is based on the size of the foretriangle (bowsprit sheave to mast and height from deck to upper foresail halyard sheave), actual measurements taken off the main, and basic beam/length/draft measurements. You can include a topsail if used. These plug into a secret formula closely guarded by the inner circle of the OGA and give rise to a handicap which, according to every gaffer owner I have ever met, is completely wrong, unfair, and badly disadvantages the boat!

I am always happy to show visitors over my boat, but unfortunately you are a bit far away for that (I am based in Southampton).


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