FWB28 chainplates

Association LA GU...
LA GUEUA-RANCE's picture
Joined: 22 Jan 2018

Hi everybody,

We are new on this very interesting forum and we have many questions about restoration of a FWB28.

Our association in Saint Malo was given "Sarah", which suffered, among other damages, from deck leakages at chainplates. It seems that these steel plates have squeezed the wooden deck; does anyone know what should be the good tension on shrouds?

She also suffered from leaks under the mast; is there a structure drawing available, with the good dimensions of barrots, pillar and frames?

Thanks a lot

 

Aeolus FWB28
Aeolus's picture
Joined: 26 Aug 2006

To Association La GU did you receive my PM ?

Association LA GU...
LA GUEUA-RANCE's picture
Joined: 22 Jan 2018

thank you Tom, take care of your back

Tom Woodward
twoodward's picture
Joined: 23 Apr 2016

To echo Steve's comment, I have an unscientific approach and just tighten them till they feel taught to the hand. As mine are rigged with deadeyes, it is usually a question of getting them as tight as I can without putting my back out.

Association LA GU...
LA GUEUA-RANCE's picture
Joined: 22 Jan 2018

Introducing SARAH

still lots of work before sailing...

27540665_2046922588878765_469049365422189455_n.jpg
Association LA GU...
LA GUEUA-RANCE's picture
Joined: 22 Jan 2018

thank you Steve for your valuable advice

Aeolus FWB28
Aeolus's picture
Joined: 26 Aug 2006

Hello and welcome.

I’m not sure if there actually is an official answer to your question.

On my 28 I have the shrouds not too tight and not too slack.

Under hard sailing my leeward shrouds are just becoming a little slack.

Seems to have worked ok for the past 15 years!

I too would be interested if anyone has a definitive answer but basically they shouldn’t be too tight.

As to the Mast and Deck, the Deck beams are normally at 2 foot spacing. The mast should rest on an area where there is a beam and this should have vertical support below from the deck to the cabin sole. The position of the mast should be 114 inches from the Stem.

Regards,

Steve


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